Proscriptions are collectively assumed societal regulations that insist certain behaviors are prohibited.  Certain enactments are proscribed within particular groups or subgroups, whether circumscribed by race, nationality, religion, culture, peer group, even self.

For instance, it is probably looked down upon by all races to get on all fours and eat out of a dish on the floor, although my 7 year-old daughter tried this out of sympathy for our dog she thought was human.

It is probably not acceptable for a Frenchman to cheek-kiss a Norwegian.  Norwegians are known for their stoicism, Frenchmen for their love of emotionally liberating wine. But, I learned right-cheek-kissing from Hispanic culture, and I do it to everybody, regardless of their culture.

An American from the States–well, at least WASPs–turn a wary eye upon worshipping a dead folk saint like Ni~no Fidencio is worshiped in the Rio Grande Valley Mexican Folk Culture.

Some proscriptions are stricter than others. Proscriptions are probably most important to teenagers, and can be stricter than adults for it determines top dog popularity.

Regarding myself, these days, not eating sugar is one of my proscriptions. But my not eating sugar has never been suppressed like my desire to cuss. Fortunately, it is not rigidly repressed, either, since my personal unconscious remembers how many times I have never been rigid about this particular proscription.  Tonight I had ice cream at Jason’s Deli.

Collective Unconscious (cu)

While the sea is the source of earthly life, the symbolic sea of the collective unconsciousness (cu) is the source of our psychic life.  In the sea of the cu are all the images–they are actual energies–that are common to all people on earth, both dead and alive, through the eons:  the Great Mother, God the Father, The Child, The Wise Old Man, and, interestingly, the Tarot cards, to name a few.  Jung works his archetypal theories around these images that reside in the cu.  He spends a lot of time on the Mother archetype.

The cu is a dark place because it is outside our human consciousness.  (Our consciousness, our knowledge, is symbolized by light.)  However, the Hubbel  H0liCOW project estimates the Universe is expanding at about 45 miles per second.  Are we doing that with our minds?

We know for sure the collective unconscious exists when it wants to get our attention.  It sometimes will give us psychological pain–the kind of pain you might run to the professionals for.  This emotional pain, in psychoanalytic terms,  are neuroses.  We won’t go into all that here.  Just know that one way to become conscious is through emotional pain–no pain no gain.

The cu wants to be known by you.  The more fish  you catch from the cu, and integrate into your conscious life, the more real becomes the cu, too.  See?  We can be intentional about it.  The creation of consciousness–making conscious the unconscious–is a great work.  By now, we know some tools to work with.

is honored to present the complete Jung Lexicon online through the graciousness and generosity of its author, Jungian analyst, Daryl Sharp, publisher and general editor of Inner City Books.

The clothbound Jung Lexicon can be purchased directly from Inner City Books.

Collective unconscious. A structural layer of the human psyche containing inherited elements, distinct from the personal unconscious. (See also archetype and archetypal image.)

The collective unconscious contains the whole spiritual heritage of mankind’s evolution, born anew in the brain structure of every individual.[The Structure of the Psyche,” CW 8, par. 342.]

Jung derived his theory of the collective unconscious from the ubiquity of psychological phenomena that could not be explained on the basis of personal experience. Unconscious fantasy activity, for instance, falls into two categories.

First, fantasies (including dreams) of a personal character, which go back unquestionably to personal experiences, things forgotten or repressed, and can thus be completely explained by individual anamnesis. Second, fantasies (including dreams) of an impersonal character, which cannot be reduced to experiences in the individual’s past, and thus cannot be explained as something individually acquired. These fantasy-images undoubtedly have their closest analogues in mythological types. . . . These cases are so numerous that we are obliged to assume the existence of a collective psychic substratum. I have called this the collective unconscious.[The Psychology of the Child Archetype,” CW 9i, par. 262.]The collective unconscious-so far as we can say anything about it at all-appears to consist of mythological motifs or primordial images, for which reason the myths of all nations are its real exponents. In fact, the whole of mythology could be taken as a sort of projection of the collective unconscious. . . . We can therefore study the collective unconscious in two ways, either in mythology or in the analysis of the individual.[“The Structure of the Psyche,” CW 8, par. 325.]

The more one becomes aware of the contents of the personal unconscious, the more is revealed of the rich layer of images and motifs that comprise the collective unconscious. This has the effect of enlarging the personality.

In this way there arises a consciousness which is no longer imprisoned in the petty, oversensitive, personal world of the ego, but participates freely in the wider world of objective interests. This widened consciousness is no longer that touchy, egotistical bundle of personal wishes, fears, hopes, and ambitions which always has to be compensated or corrected by unconscious counter-tendencies; instead, it is a function of relationship to the world of objects, bringing the individual into absolute, binding, and indissoluble communion with the world at large.[The Function of the Unconscious,” CW 7, par. 275.]



Integrity is about the fullness of self and requires a spiritual and transformative journey. Integrity is one of the most misunderstood and misused words in the dictionary.  What is the true meaning of integrity?


Integrity is consists of values, expectations, and outcomes. In ethics, integrity is regarded as the honesty, and accuracy of one’s actions.”

Let me call out the key words in this definition that are often missed. Consistency. honesty, and truthfulness or accuracy of one’s actions.

Consistency is about being the same regardless of the situation. For example, do you know of leaders whose mood changes by the day and make rash decisions on certain days, yet calm and engaging on other days? This would be an example of inconsistency of actions and outcomes.

Consistency is a choice that we make as leaders every single day, even when the situation or environment is not great. If you just had an argument with someone before walking into your next meeting, consistency means that you will make a conscious choice to shift gears and release yourself from the negativity of the last conversation and not bring that to the next meeting.

Honesty or accuracy of one’s actions requires intentionality and thought. How honest or accurate are your behaviors, actions, and words with other people that you lead? I was at a meeting recently with a CEO who cares deeply about values yet is out of integrity because there is a lack of honesty and authenticity in how he behaves. While he says that he cares about teamwork, he doesn’t listen to others and gets defensive when challenged with different views. He believes in creating a culture of love but publicly berates and belittles junior employees.

Integrity stems from the Latin word ‘integer’ which means whole and complete. So integrity requires an inner sense of ‘wholeness’ and consistency of character. When you are in integrity, people should be able to visibly see it through your actions, words, decisions, methods, and outcomes. When you are ‘whole’ and consistent, there is only one you. You bring that same you wherever you are, regardless of the circumstance. You don’t leave parts of yourself behind. You don’t have a ‘work you,’ a ‘family you,’ and a ‘social you.’ You are YOU all the time.

Given the real definition of integrity, we recognize that it is actually extremely difficult to be in integrity 100% of the time. We aspire to be in integrity with what we believe but sometimes, we mess up. Sometimes, our emotions get the best of us and we are unable to intentionally manage our behavior and actions. Sometimes, we don’t give ourselves permission to be our true selves out of fear of what others may think or due to an inability to truly ‘integrate’ the various parts of ourselves into ONE, complete WHOLE person.

So, what does it take to be someone who leads with integrity? Consciousness and choice. I believe that there are at least 6 things that great leaders choose to do to be on a journey towards greater integrity:

1) Understands the true definition of integrity (hopefully after this post, you will be able to check this box).

2) Intentionally reflects on what to say, how to behave, how to make decisions in a way that is reflective of his/her values and beliefs.

3) Is the same authentic person regardless of the situation. You can meet this leader with their family, friends, church, or at a boardroom, and you will see a consistency in behavior, actions, and words. You will recognize this person no matter what environment he/she is in.

4) Recognizes the impact that he/she has on others. This leader is conscious of how his/her behavior and words impacts those around them intentionally and often times, unintentionally. So when this leader behaves in a way that is out of integrity, he/she stops, acknowledges, apologizes, and corrects course. This requires humility, authenticity, and ‘others-centeredness’ as you need to ‘see’ how others are responding to you.

5) Actively focuses on the development of character and wholeness. This leader spends time intentionally on this area through various areas, such as reading, getting coached, listening to the counsel of others, going to leadership development courses, and reflecting on how to develop character.

6) Enrolls others to be on the same journey. This leader aims to walk in integrity and as others see that, they are drawn to this. They can have confidence in this leader with the belief that this leader will do what he/she says and believes. They are able to inspire others to be on the same journey of lifelong pursuit of ‘wholeness’ and ultimately, INTEGRITY.

When I see people who really have integrity, I recognize it. Don’t you? I hope that I can enroll you to join me on this journey by starting with understanding the true definition of integrity.

Original article and video can be found here.


So-Young Kang is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. She is passionate about humanizing the world and writes, speaks, advises and builds businesses to raise human consciousness. Her latest venture is Gnowbe, a transformational learning platform that focuses on mindset and behavior change through mobile. She is also Catalyst of Awaken Group, a transformation design firm, Co-Founder of The Young Professionals’ Group, a global non-profit dedicated to helping young people achieve their professional dreams and author of Inside Out.

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This Spirituality and Transformative Leadership series was set up as a response to the need to bring ‘higher order’ principles into leadership today and to spark an ongoing discussion as to the role that spirituality, as distinct from religion, has in today’s world. It is a curated series that invites both Young Global Leaders and others with an interest in leadership to contribute to a discussion on the role that spirituality plays in leadership today. For more information, please see the following link for an overview of the origins of this project see and for a link to all the blog posts in the series please click here.

The Other

excerpted from The WASP and El Curandero

As Fr. Bob, Episcopal priest, once explained, The Other is that entity that is so completely not me, so unknowable because it is so foreign, that it carries the numinous qualities of the divine.  Moses met The Other in the burning bush and then later came down off Mt. Horeb with white hair to prove it.  We attract that which we fear.”


When referring to my The Other I am basically referring to Alberto Salinas, El Curandero.  He lived in and breathed the air of Mexican Folk Culture.  Well, I did too, as I crawled into bed with that culture (acculturated).

What created the condition of “The Rub” (the transcendent function), by which I hoped to individuate, was Alberto’s connection with a Magical World View-especially since he channeled the spirit of the dead Mexican folk saint, El Ni~no Fidencio, which practice qualified him as a shaman.  To my way of thinking, this made him a card-carrying member of The Other World.  And he was my spiritual director.

The Other in The Other World tensioned against me as the WASP in McAllen, Texas.  Forbidden desire was powerful.  Something had to give.

Mexican Folk Culture

Mexican Folk Culture is the culture of Mexican immigrants in the USA, legal and illegal, are, predominantly, those who don’t have medical insurance.  Culturally, they are often called the poor ones, or el pobres. Their faith in the old ways—old stories, old medicine, old religion (and witches, demons, and spirits), mediated by curanderismo—is sometimes all that gives them esperanza y salud, hope and health. And perceived control over their situation of poverty.

(excerpted from The WASP and El Curandero)
The still suffering Mestizos—the genetic mix of Native Americans (of all the Americas, not just the U.S.) and the sixteenth century conquistadors, (the conquering Spaniards)—are the ones that really count, as far as Mexican folk culture goesThe first thing Mestizos in Mexico do when their babies are born is to check their skin color and report it to l the extended family members in the waiting room, for they know the darker the skin all, the more discrimination the child will face.  They pray for lighter skin.  One can pretty well guess why Mestizos struggling in Mexico want to come to the U.S. where all men are created equal and the minimum wage is more than double.  When they cross the border into the U.S.—some across the international border bridges, some across the Rio Grande River—they become known as el pobres, or the poor ones.  They have suffered physically from poverty and mentally from alienation.  It is through befriending el pobres that I can confront my awareness of existential guilt.  Why should I have money and they don’t? 


Archetypal images are the imaginal faces of energies from the collective unconscious that every human being in the world recognizes.  There’s the receptive Great Mother archetype in aspects we are all familiar with-both loving and terrible; the Father archetype evidenced as the creative God the Father; the Trickster; The Child; the anima and animus; and archetypal images of the Tarot cards such as The Fool, The Tower, or The World.

Archetypal images carry with them a numinous feeling since they come from the realm of the divine.

Jungian definition:
is honored to present the complete Jung Lexicon online through the graciousness and generosity of its author, Jungian analyst, Daryl Sharp, publisher and general editor of Inner City Books.

The clothbound Jung Lexicon can be purchased directly from Inner City Books.

 Archetypal image. The form or representation of an archetype in consciousness. (See also collective unconscious.)

[The archetype is] a dynamism which makes itself felt in the numinosity and fascinating power of the archetypal image.[“On the Nature of the Psyche,” CW 8, par. 414.]

Archetypal images, as universal patterns or motifs which come from the collective unconscious, are the basic content of religions, mythologies, legends and fairy tales.

An archetypal content expresses itself, first and foremost, in metaphors. If such a content should speak of the sun and identify with it the lion, the king, the hoard of gold guarded by the dragon, or the power that makes for the life and health of man, it is neither the one thing nor the other, but the unknown third thing that finds more or less adequate expression in all these similes, yet-to the perpetual vexation of the intellect-remains unknown and not to be fitted into a formula.[“The Psychology of the Child Archetype,” CW 9i, par. 267]

On a personal level, archetypal motifs are patterns of thought or behavior that are common to humanity at all times and in all places.

For years I have been observing and investigating the products of the unconscious in the widest sense of the word, namely dreams, fantasies, visions, and delusions of the insane. I have not been able to avoid recognizing certain regularities, that is, types. There are types of situations and types of figures that repeat themselves frequently and have a corresponding meaning. I therefore employ the term “motif” to designate these repetitions. Thus there are not only typical dreams but typical motifs in dreams. . . . [These] can be arranged under a series of archetypes, the chief of them being . . . the shadow, the wise old man, the child (including the child hero), the mother (“Primordial Mother” and “Earth Mother”) as a supraordinate personality (“daemonic” because supraordinate), and her counterpart the maiden, and lastly the anima in man and the animus in woman.[“The Psychological Aspects of the Kore,” ibid., par. 309.]